Posts

Carnival ribbons - Chiacchiere

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Different versions of these fried dough ribbons can be found all over Italy at Carnival.

Pizza ebraica - Jewish sweet "pizza"

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This delectable item is not pizza at all, but an eggless, unleavened pastry crammed full of whole almonds and candied fruit and cooked until it looks rather burnt but is in fact absolutely perfect, with the nuts crunchy and fruits bursting with flavour.

Ricciarelli - Sienese almond biscuits

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For many, along with the spice-dense panforte, the light, sophisticated ricciarello is the true Tuscan Christmas treat. They used to be made in convents and apothecary shops, the only places where the right spices and storage conditions would be found.

Tiramisù

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Tiramisu (literally “Pick me up”) seems to have been around for generations, but is in fact a creation from the 1970s! The version that we teach at our cooking school in Tuscany uses custard.

Orange and chocolate cake

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This is a typical Sephardic Passover cake, which has various versions, made throughout the Mediterranean.

Cantuccini

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These are the classic “biscotti” as they are often known in the US (in Italian, this just means any “cookies”). Using the finest flour available results in the most mouthwatering morsels.
Panna cotta

Panna Cotta

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The secret to a good panna cotta is achieving something that sets, but is still wonderfully creamy. Experiment with agar- agar quantities since they do vary!

Tuscan Grape Harvest Cake

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In Tuscany, this complex-flavoured but simple to make cake is only made for a few weeks a year, when the small, sweet, seedy red grapes are around (many are “gleaned” in the vineyards after the harvest). Use the sweetest red grapes you can.
ricotta cheese cake

Ricotta cheesecake

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We have met some true cheesecake connoisseurs at our cooking school in Italy, but many say that this has become their favourite baked cheesecake recipe!
budino

Budino ~ Italian Crème Caramel

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Traditionally a "budino" is made in a large mould, not little individual moulds. It makes for a more spectacular sight when it it served, but be careful when you turn it upside down to serve!